Mario Molina

Mario Molina

Doctor Mario Molina is a Mexican scientist specialising in atmospheric chemistry. In 1995 he obtained the Nobel Chemistry Prize for his work on the impact of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) on the ozone layer. His research led him to warn the international community as early as 1974, in an article published with Professor Sherwood Rowland in the journal Nature, on the dangers of CFCs, and their role in the depletion of the ozone layer. His scientific discoveries and outreach activities of the international community resulted, in 1994, in the signing of the Montreal Protocol which bans the use of CFCs (to be found mainly in aerosols and cooling mediums).

A graduate of the faculty of chemistry of the Autonomous University of Mexico, he continued his studies at the University of Fribourg (Germany) and holds a PhD from UC-Berkeley. He taught at the MIT from 1997 to 2004, was a climate advisor for President Obama and sits on a number of scientific committees and environmental organisations in Mexico and the United States. In 2003, he was one of the 32 Nobel Prize winners to sign the Humanist Manifesto. The Mario Molina Centre which he founded in Mexico is a centre for the research and support of public policy in the sectors of the environment and sustainable development.